DFD Takes the Dempsey Challenge

DFD is excited to support our communities and encourage others to walk, run or bike in support of The Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope & Healing in this year’s Dempsey Challenge.

When and Where does this happen?
The 2017 Dempsey Challenge takes place in Lewsiton-Auburn, Maine, September 29-30.

runnersWhat does it benefit?
Proceeds from the challenge go to the Dempsey Center. The Dempsey Center offers a vibrant and compassionate environment where an interdisciplinary team of oncology professionals improves the healing experience for those impacted by cancer. Through customized programs The Dempsey Center provides support services that complement treatments, support caregivers, patients and their families equally Source: Demspeycenter.org

How to get involved:
Anyone can get involved and there is an event for everyone.

Bike – 10, 25, 70, or 100 miles
Two-day 140+ mile bike ride presented by L.L. Bean
Run or walk 5K (3.1 miles) and 10K (6.2 miles)
Festival in the Park – Saturday 8 am – 1 pm, Sunday 9 am – 5 pm
Music Festival at Festival in the Park
Kid’s Fun Run and Family Ride
Survivor Walk
You can show your love for team DFD by donating your loose change at one of our coin jars at the front desk at each DFD Health Center location or to one of our team members using this link: http://support.dempseychallenge.org/site/TR?company_id=3823&fr_id=1150&pg=company

To learn more about The Dempsey Challenge please visit:

Dempsey Challenge Information

School Safety 101

DFD’s helpful tips for a fun and safe school year.

Class is back in session and DFD is here to help get your child;s school year off to a safe and healthy start.

Your child’s backpack should:

  • Have a padded back
  • Have wide, padded shoulder straps
  • Be the right fit: below the shoulder blades and right at the waist

School Bus Rules

When getting on the bus, remind your children to:

  • Stay away from traffic when waiting for the bus
  • Line up away from the street or road as the bus approaches
  • Wait until the bus has completely stopped and the door opens before entering

While riding the bus, remind your children to:

  • Buckle up if seat belts are available
  • Stay in their seat
  • Keep aisles clear of books and bags
  • Wait for the bus to completely stop before getting up from your seat

When getting off the bus, remind your children to:

  • Use the handrail when exiting the bus
  • Make sure the driver can see them
  • Stay away from the rear wheels at all times
  • When crossing the street, wait for a signal from the bus driver

Stop bullying in its tracks.

Make sure your kids are ready for a kind and caring school year. Remind them that bullying is never ok.

  • 30% of young people admit to bullying others
  • 28% of students in grades 6-12 experience bullying
  • When bystanders intervene, bullying stops within 10 seconds

National Immunization Awareness Month

August is National Immunization Awareness Month and DFD wants to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. Vaccines help prevent dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases.

How does a vaccine work?

Vaccines are made from the same germs that cause disease, but the germs in the vaccines are either killed or weakened so they won’t make you sick. Once the vaccine is injected into your body, your immune system reacts to the vaccine by making antibodies. The antibodies destroy the vaccine germs, and then stay in your body, giving you immunity if you are ever exposed to the real disease. The antibodies are there to protect you!

Why are vaccines important?

Diseases like polio are becoming very rare in the U.S. because we have been vaccinating against them. However, vaccine-preventable diseases such as whooping cough and measles are still a threat and continue to infect U.S. children—resulting in hospitalizations and deaths each year.  The spread of dangerous diseases happen when children who aren’t vaccinated spread disease to other children who are too young to be vaccinated or to people with weakened immune systems.

Check out these new videos from the National Vaccine Program Office and learn how vaccines can keep you and the people you love stay healthy.



National Health Center Week: August 12-18

This August we celebrate National Health Center Week to raise awareness of the important role health centers play in our communities.

Health centers serve 27 million patients in the United States, which is about one in fifteen people who utilize health centers as their health care home. As a Patient-Centered Medical Home, DFD meets and exceeds the healthcare needs of its patients through innovative, patient-centered primary care services.

Health centers across the United States perform just as well or better than private physicians on 94% of quality measures and save an average of $1,263 per patient per year.

DFD is the highest-ranking community health center in Maine and the nation for its commitment to quality care. But what makes DFD different from other providers?

  • More night and weekend hours
  • More likely to accept new patients
  • Community-governed
  • More services under one roof

Together, let’s raise awareness about the positive impacts health centers have on our communities. Share with friends and family on how DFD is supporting our neighborhoods and can help support them.

In Memoriam: Karen Marie Bronk

Karen Marie BronkKaren Marie Bronk

12/25/53 – 06/18/2018

Karen Bronk of Turner died peacefully at the Hospice House on June 18th after a three-year struggle with cancer.

Karen was born in Connecticut into a family which included six brothers. The family lived for a time in Germany before moving back to the States.

Karen graduated from UMass Boston and eventually earned a Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of New England.

Karen and her husband, Peter Driscoll, moved to Maine from Boston in 1979 seeking a more peaceful and rural lifestyle. They first settled in Salem before moving to Turner in 1990.

Karen worked as a professional social worker all of her adult life. She worked in several local agencies including Tri-County Mental Health, Androscoggin Home Health and Hospice Services, and the Spurwink School. For the past 16 years, she has been a behavioral health specialist working with DFD Russell Medical Center in Turner where she provided kindness, support and help for individuals struggling with life challenges to find their own path for success.

Karen was a woman of many talents and interests. She was an avid reader. She loved to garden, her home surrounded by beautiful flowering trees, shrubs and plants. She was an accomplished equestrian and loved the gentle and subtle relationship she was able to develop with her horses. She was a marathoner. And she was a skilled canoeist. Karen and Peter paddled hundreds of miles of wilderness rivers in Maine and Canada. For a short time, they operated a small canoe camping business.

Nothing brought Karen more joy than her family. Karen and Peter have been together through life’s joys, hardships and adventures for more than 40 years. Theirs was a loving, respectful and committed relationship.

Karen decided later in life that she wanted to become a mother. She began the process that led to the arrival of first Rufino (now 16) and later Manuel (now 14) into their family. She was a fabulous mother and worked tirelessly to create a home environment that was nurturing, gentle, challenging and supportive. She took great pride in witnessing her two sons grow into fine and mature young men.

Karen was an incredibly kind and gentle soul. She also possessed a core strength that sustained her through her difficult struggle with cancer. She continued to work until the last month of her life because she viewed her work as a commitment to making her corner of the world a better place. She is fondly remembered by many friends and colleagues.

She is survived by her husband, Peter, and sons Rufino and Manuel, and five brothers.

Gifts in her memory can be made to the Karen Bronk fund at DFD Russell Medical Center in Turner which will be used to support unmet patient needs.

A Memorial Service to celebrate her life will be scheduled in the near future.

Food Mobile to Bring Emergency Food  To Monmouth

WHAT: The Good Shepherd Food Bank’s Food Mobile will be distributing food, including fresh produce, perishable and non-perishable items to people in need in the MONMOUTH, NORTH MOMOUTH, LEEDS AND WAYNE area.

WHO: Anyone in need of emergency food assistance in MONMOUTH, NORTH MOMOUTH, LEEDS, WAYNE and the surrounding area is welcome to attend.

WHEN: JUNE 21, 2018 FROM 1030 AM TO 12 NOON

WHERE: MONMOUTH TOWN OFFICE PARKING LOT, MAIN STREET, MONMOUTH, MAINE

WHY: Good Shepherd Food Bank’s Food Mobile program allows us to expand our outreach to Maine’s neediest and most underserved communities. Designed to be a low-barrier distribution, our Food Mobile visits communities with a demand for emergency and supplemental food that has outgrown the capacity of local food pantries.
This distribution has been made possible through the generosity of :
Helen and George Ladd Charitable Corp.
Lincoln Ladd
P.O. Box 7
Wayne, ME 04284

About Good Shepherd Food Bank
As the largest hunger relief organization in Maine, Good Shepherd Food Bank provides for Mainers facing hunger by distributing nutritious food to more than 400 partner agencies across the state, including food pantries, meal sites, schools, and senior programs. Together with its network, the Food Bank leads a statewide effort to combat the root causes of hunger by engaging in advocacy, nutrition education, and strategic partnerships. In 2015, the Food Bank distributed 19 million meals to families, children, and seniors in need throughout Maine. Website: www.feedingmaine.org; Phone: (207) 782-3554; Facebook: www.facebook.com/feedingmaine; Twitter: www.twitter.com/feedingmaine.

DFD’s Guide to Ticks

Ticks are in full-force this season and cases of tick-borne diseases such as Lyme disease are on the rise. Use the information below to make sure you and your family are being tick smart.

TicksIdentification

Deer Tick: Deer ticks are known to cause Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis and Powassan.

Dog Tick: Dog ticks are not known to transmit Lyme disease.

Learn more about identifying ticks here: http://extension.umaine.edu/ipm/tickid/

Prevention

  • Wear light-colored, long-sleeved clothing.
  • Use insect repellent on skin or clothing.
  • Do regular tick checks when returning inside.
  • Protect furry friends with repellents and ask your vet about a Lyme disease vaccine.

Did you find an attached tick?

How big is the tick, pencil eraser or pencil tip?
Was the tick embedded into your skin?
Do you know how long the tick was embedded?
Do you have a rash?

Removal

  • Using tweezers, grasp the tick close to the skin and gently pull until the tick lets go.
  • Using a tick spoon, place the wide part of the notch on the skin near the tick. Apply downward pressure on the skin and slide the remover forward to frame the tick until it becomes detached. –Maine CDC
  • Do not be concerned if the entire insect does not come out; it will work its way out. Do not dig for it.
  • Some redness at the extraction site is normal.
  • Clean the area around the bite and watch for any signs and symptoms for 30 days.

Symptoms

Symptoms include, but aren’t limited to:

  • fever
  • headache
  • weakness
  • fatigue
  • body aches
  • joint pain
  • rash
  • vomiting
  • confusion
  • loss of coordination
  • speech difficulties
  • changes in behavior
  • seizures

If you remove an engorged deer tick, store it in a small container for potential testing and consult your primary care provider immediately.

 

Mental Health Awareness Month

As part of our commitment to whole person, patient-centered care, DFD is committed to your mental health and provides behavioral health specialists as part of your health care team.

Did you know?

  • 43.8 million adults experience mental illness in a given year
  • One-half of all chronic mental illness begins by the age of 14
  • 60% of adults with a mental illness didn’t receive mental health services during the previous year
  • One in 25 Americans lived with a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression
  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. It accounts for the loss of more than 41,000 American lives each year, more than double the number of lives lost to homicide.

Spot Mental Health Warning Signs:

  • Excessive worrying or fear
  • Changes in sleeping habits or feeling tired and having low energy
  • Feeling excessively sad or hopeless
  • Confused thinking or difficulty concentrating and learning.

How to Get Help:

  • Talk with your doctor
  • Connect with other individuals and families
  • Seek a counselor

DFD Raising Awareness: Colorectal Cancer

Did you know that 1 in 20 people will develop colorectal cancer?

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths, but if caught early it’s treatable and can even be curable. Some symptoms of colorectal cancer can include:

  • A change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation, or narrowing of the stool that lasts for more than a few days
  • A feeling that you need to have a bowel movement that is not relieved by having one
  • Rectal bleeding and blood in the stool, which may make the stool look dark
  • Cramping or abdominal pain
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Unintended weight loss

These symptoms could be caused by something other than colorectal cancer, but if you’re experiencing any or all of these, talk to your doctor.

Regular screening saves lives. DFD offers InSure FIT testing. A non-invasive test completed in the privacy of your own home to catch colorectal cancer quickly.

Nearly 75% of all colon cancer cases could be prevented with healthy lifestyles. Lower your risk by following the tips below:

  • Quit smoking
  • Exercise daily
  • Reduce consumption of red and processed meat
  • Get enough calcium and Vitamin D

Go Red for Women

DFD Celebrates Go Red for Women on February 2, 2018.

Heart disease is the #1 killer of women and 90% of women have one or more risk factors for heart disease or stroke.

The good news? 80% of heart disease deaths can be prevented with education and action.

How to lower your risk for heart disease and stroke:

  • Get active! Just 30 minutes of physical activity each day can lower your risk.
  • Know and Control your numbers. We’re talking about Blood Pressure(BP), Cholesterol and Body Mass Index (BMI).
  • Quit Smoking. Quitting is the best thing you can do for your health. Ask us about our smoking cessation program to help kick the habit for good.