Sleep Hygiene for Better Health

We spend approximately one-third of our lives sleeping, but are we sleeping well? Sleep hygiene refers to the quality of sleep as well as lifestyle habits, sleeping routine and environment. When we focus on achieving more quality sleep, we start to see our physical, mental and emotional health benefit.

How much should I sleep each night?

Recommended sleep amounts vary for different stages of life. Newborns and babies should sleep for 14-17 hours, toddlers should average 12-14 hours, pre-teens should get 12 hours, and adults over the age of 18 should aim for 7-9 hours every night.

If you’re not getting enough sleep, it could show up as these symptoms:

  • Sleepy during the day
  • Being moody or irritable
  • Unable to focus or concentrate
  • Increased appetite
  • Skin becomes dull; dark circles form under eyes

The average person sleeps less than 7 hours per night.

Why is sleep so important?

Getting enough quality sleep affects your health in many ways. While we’re asleep, our bodies rest and repair themselves from soothing sore muscles, processing data in our brain and building up our immune system. Good sleep also:

  • Regulates hormones
  • Improves cognitive function
  • Aids in weight management
  • Reduces risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke


Getting quality sleep each night also benefits your emotional and mental health. In fact, consistent, quality sleep has been shown to reduce stress, anxiety and depression.

What can I do to get more sleep?

When we think of getting quality sleep, we usually think of the actions we do right before bed. However, all the actions and decisions we make during the day affect our sleep. To help make sleep hygiene a priority to your health, consider the following lifestyle choices.

During the day

  • Wake up at the same time every morning
  • Exercise regularly; move your body every day
  • Drink plenty of water; eat nutritious foods

During the afternoon

  • Avoid taking naps
  • Limit caffeine and sugar intake
  • Get exposure to natural light (it helps regulate your circadian rhythm)

During the evening

  • Turn off electronics 1 hour before bed
  • Avoid nicotine, alcohol and other substances
  • Create a ritual that promotes relaxation

Your relaxation ritual can include anything that makes you feel less stressed and ready to fall asleep. This could be reading a book, a warm shower, yoga or stretching, journaling, or listening to soft music.



Takeaway: Your actions and behaviors during the day affect your sleep at night, which in turn affects your overall wellbeing and quality of life. Creating a lifestyle that supports healthy sleep hygiene is important to your short and long-term physical and mental health.

If you have issues with the amount or quality of your sleep, contact your healthcare provider. They can help to determine any potential sleep disorders or other lifestyle changes that will aid in your health.

COVID-19 FAQ Sheet

Coronavirus cases have been spreading in the United States since early 2020 and cases have been on the rise since the fall months. Becoming informed and taking proper precautions is imperative in beating this disease.

 

Basic Facts

What is COVID-19? COVID-19 is a new coronavirus that has not been identified before. It is not the same as other coronaviruses that cause the common cold, for example.

 

Who is at risk? While everyone is at risk for catching and spreading the COVID-19 disease, those who are aged 65 and older, pregnant, or who have underlying health concerns are at higher risk.

 

How is it spread? The virus that causes the disease we now call COVID-19 is most commonly spread between people who are in close contact with one another, approximately 6 feet or less. It spreads through respiratory droplets produced when a person coughs, sneezes, talks, sings, or breathes.

 

These droplets can then be inhaled through the nose and mouth and make their way into your airways and lungs, causing an infection. Respiratory droplets can also land on objects and surfaces and then be transferred when a person touches that object or surface and then touches their face, nose or mouth. The main way believed to spread the virus is through human contact with an infected individual and not contaminated surfaces.

 

What are the signs or symptoms of COVID-19? Signs and symptoms of COVID-19 are similar to that of the seasonal flu with some exceptions and may range from mild to severe illness. Symptoms can appear anywhere from 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. The most common symptoms are:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Muscle/body aches
  • Congestion/runny nose
  • Nausea/vomiting/diarrhea

If you experience shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, new loss of smell or taste you may have contracted COVID-19.

 

Is it possible to test positive for COVID-19 and the flu at the same time? Yes. Because signs and symptoms are similar, testing for the seasonal flu and COVID-19 may display similar readings. Getting a seasonal flu vaccine is an important way to protect yourself from illness and prevent a variable when getting tested for COVID-19.

 

When should I get emergency care from COVID-19 symptoms? If you or anyone in your family has contracted COVID-19, it’s advised to be alert to any change in illness or symptoms. If breathing becomes more difficult, the person shows confusion, or a blue-ish tint to their lips or face, call 911 IMMEDIATELY.

When you call emergency services, let them know that the patient has tested positive for COVID-19.

 

Prevention

How can I protect myself and my family? The best way to protect you and your family are to:

  • Wear masks/facial coverings
  • Avoid crowds
  • Social distance whenever possible
  • Wash hands with soap frequently

 

Is it safe to get medical care? It’s important to keep your regularly scheduled appointments and screenings to optimize your health. However, if you are feeling unwell, it’s advised that you stay at home. Contact your clinic office to let them know you are unwell and to reschedule appointments and screenings for another time.

It is also possible that your clinic office may contact you to reschedule appointments and screenings if they have had an influx of more serious health concerns including COVID-19 cases.

 

How often should I clean? It’s advised that you wash your hands often throughout the day and after sneezing, coughing, going to the bathroom and preparing and eating food. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol.

Clean and disinfect high touch surfaces daily including refrigerators, tech devices, door handles and knobs, counters and other highly uses services.

 

What should I use for products? Regular EPA-approved household cleaners are sufficient. It’s important to note that cleaning and disinfecting are different.

  • Cleaning: using soap and water, removes dirt, germs and impurities from surfaces.
  • Disinfecting: kills germs that are on surfaces.

For the best protection, clean and then disinfect surfaces.

 

If You or Someone You Know Gets Sick

What do I do if myself or someone in my family gets sick? If you or a family member gets sick, it’s highly advised that you stay at home whether you believe you’ve contracted COVID-19 or something different such as the seasonal flu.

Keeping washing hands and disinfecting surfaces. Monitor the individual’s symptoms and keep them isolated if possible.

 

What medical supplies should I have on hand? It’s best to have at least 14 days of prescription medications on hand at all times, if possible. It’s also helpful to have:

  • A thermometer
  • Tissues
  • Pain/fever reducer
  • Cough suppressants
  • Soap/hand sanitizer

 

What do I do if I come into contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19? It’s imperative that you stay at home and self-isolate for at least 14 days. Stay alert for any symptoms that may arise. If you become ill, do NOT go to a clinic. This may increase the spread. If you develop serious symptoms as stated above, call 911 immediately.

If you have any further questions about COVID-19, please call your primary health care provider’s office or look to the CDC website for guidance at www.cdc.gov.

 

We all must do our part to limit the spread of this disease and keep ourselves and our communities safe.

Source: cdc.gov

DFD Russell Free Flu Shot Clinic

November flu shot clinic open to adult DFD patients

DFD Russell Medical Centers is offering a free flu clinic for its patients on Saturday, November 7 from 10am-2pm at our Monmouth, Turner and Leeds locations.

Getting a flu shot lowers your risk of contracting the seasonal flu by 40-60%.

To participate…

Arrive at your DFD clinic location between the hours of 10am-2pm on Saturday, November 7, 2020. Because there is limited availability of seasonal flu vaccines, it’s best that you arrive early. Patients will be seen in the order in which they arrive and must be at least 18 years old.

Please Stay home if…

To keep our communities safe, we ask that you arrive wearing a mask or face covering and remain socially distanced from others. Reported symptoms of COVID-19 vary but include symptoms similar to those caused by the seasonal flu. Stay home to rest if you have:

  • fever or chills
  • cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing
  • new loss of taste and/or smell
  • headache, fatigue, body aches
  • sore throat, congestion, runny nose
  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea

Flu vaccines protect you and your family and help prevent the spread of illnesses. In fact, around half of all Americans get a flu shot each year!

 

Can’t attend this flu clinic? Call your primary care provider to schedule a seasonal flu shot for yourself and your family today!

Living Well Workshops by Healthy Living for ME

Now Open for Registration! 

 

DFD Russell Medical Centers is excited to announce new workshops by Healthy Living for Me. These workshops each discuss one topic including Living Well for Better Health, Living with Chronic Pain and Living with Diabetes.

Healthy Living for Me is an online resource providing evidence-based health education, fitness instruction and self-care strategies with the aim of improving wellness and quality of life.

These workshops are free to the public however, registration is required. Attendance can be over the Zoom platform or by telephone. Each class is led by a team of three instructors from different organization partners including Bonny Eagle Adult Education and Spectrum Generations.

 

Interested in virtually attending one of these class series? Check out the details below:

 

Living Well for Better Health: 6-session series

WHEN: Tuesdays, September 15 – October 20, 2020
TIME: 1pm – 3pm
WHERE: Online via Zoom
INFO: Register here or by contacting Katherine Mills: kmills@healthylivingforme.org or (207) 440-2390.

 

Living Well with Chronic Pain: 6-session series

WHEN: Wednesdays, September 30 – November 4, 2020
TIME: TBD
WHERE: Online, via Zoom or by telephone
INFO: For details and course information: email info@healthylivingforme.org or call 1-800-620-6036.

 

Living Well with Diabetes: 6-session series

WHEN: Tuesdays, October 6 – November 10, 2020
TIME: 9am – 11am
WHERE: Online via Zoom
INFO: Register here or by contacting Katherine Mills at kmills@healthylivingforme.org or call (207) 440-2390.

Keeping Your Kids Active This Summer

Studies show that over the summer kids can lose much of what they learned during the school year. By planning activities for your kids this summer, you’re keeping them physically, mentally and socially strong. The added structure to their daily routine is a bonus for the entire family.

 

Staying Active

Federal guidelines show that kids aged 6-17 need 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity every single day. This includes a mixture of aerobic and strengthening exercises recommended at least three days per week.

  • Aerobic: hiking, walking, skateboarding, rollerblading, swimming
  • Muscle strengthening: climbing rope/trees/monkey bars, tug-of-war games
  • Bone strengthening: running, hop scotch, jump rope

 

Brain Training

Exercising their brain is also critical to the development of your children. Help keep their problem solving and critical thinking skills strong, so they’ll be prepared come September.

  • Practice: Go through schoolwork packets together
  • Creative time: write and tell stories, draw pictures, build structures with LEGOs
  • New Skills: DIY projects, gardening, cooking—anything to keep kids thinking

 

Social Skills

Your children can still grow their social skills this summer even when social distancing. Being around their peers in a virtual environment will help them learn how to express their feelings, thoughts, and ideas.

  • Camp: If open and safe to attend, consider overnight or day camp which provides social skills, physical activity and brain training
  • Classes: are they interested in dancing, drama, or learning to code? Sign them up! There are many online and virtual classes available
  • Friends: a neighborhood party is a great way to be social and be active outside—just be sure to maintain proper social distancing and safety guidelines

 

Having a structure and routine will keep your kids learning, growing and free of boredom. Planning activities that you know your kids will enjoy are key to keeping them physically, mentally and socially active this summer.

 

 

Introducing Secure Online Bill Pay

A fast, secure and convenient way to pay your bill online.

At DFD Russell Medical Center, we are committed to making your healthcare experience simple and reliable, including the way you pay your bill. Secure Online Bill Pay is fast, convenient and accessible 24 hours a day, seven days per week.

You don’t have to have to have a patient portal to use Secure Online Bill Pay—anyone can pay online.

What you will need:

  • Most recent billing statement
  • Patient account number

How to use Secure Online Bill Pay:

  • Simply go to dfdrussell.org
  • Select “Pay my bill” from the For our Patients drop down menu
  • Enter the required information
  • Pay using desktop, tablet or smart phone

Accepted payments include major credit cards, debit cards, or electronic withdrawal from a checking or savings account.

Payments are still accepted through mail or by phone.

If you have questions about your bill or making payments online, please reach out to us at (207) 524-3501

 

 

 

Minding Your Mental Health

Mental health is your emotional, psychological and overall wellbeing. It affects how you think, feel and act. It also helps in establishing how you handle stress, relate to other people, and make choices. Your mental health is not in a static state and requires your attention throughout your entire life.

If you have poor mental health at any point in your life, your thinking, mood, and behaviors could be affected. Family history, life experiences and biological factors such as brain chemistry can contribute to mental health issues.

 

Importance of positive mental health

When you care for your mental health, you’re caring for your overall wellbeing. Positive mental health promotes productivity at work and school, maintains your connections and relationships, and helps you to cope with the stresses of daily life.

There are many ways to maintain positive mental health.

  • Connect with others often
  • Be physically active regularly
  • Volunteer or help others
  • Get proper sleep
  • Eat nutritious meals
  • Talk about your thoughts and feelings
  • Create coping skills for stress

 

Early signs of mental health issues

There are early warning signs to look for whether it’s in your own life or someone you care about. While this isn’t an all-inclusive list, experiencing one or more of the following could indicate a mental health problem:

  • Changes in sleeping patterns
  • Self-isolating from people and normal activities
  • Changes in energy levels
  • Showing signs of apathy or disinterest
  • Feeling hopeless or helpless
  • Any unexplained aches and pains
  • Unusual irritability
  • Severe mood swings
  • Using substances more frequently (alcohol, smoking, drugs)
  • Inability to perform daily tasks

 

Quick note: If you need professional help, don’t be afraid—reach out. Discuss recommended courses of action with your healthcare provider.

Those with poor mental health or a diagnosed mental illness have increased chances of physical health issues such as stroke, diabetes, and heart disease. Your mental and physical health go hand in hand and are integral to your overall wellbeing.

COVID-19 Updates

The health and safety of our patients, staff, and community are of the highest priority to DFD Russell Medical Centers.

We are committed to taking all necessary precautions to actively reduce the risk of further transmission of COVID-19 in our community. Please reference this page and our Facebook page for updates regarding COVID-19.

 

COVID Vaccine Information as of 3/15/21:

DFD Russell Medical Center is not currently scheduling vaccine clinics for 1st doses. We will be delivering 2nd doses to those who we have previously vaccinated but are not taking names for a waiting list at this time.

We will update this website weekly. If patients would like a vaccine, please review the Maine CDC website for public vaccination locations https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites or call 211.

COVID Vaccine Information as of 3/1/21:

DFD Russell Medical Center has received a limited amount of COVID-19 Vaccine for our patients who are over 60 years of age and have the highest risk chronic conditions. We will be calling those patients this week (starting 3/1/21) to schedule appointments for a vaccine clinic on Saturday March 6th.

Due to the limited supply, and uncertainty of when we will receive additional doses, we will not be able to meet all demands of this population (we have over 3,000 pts and only 100 doses). We will update this website weekly. If patients have not received a call, and would like a vaccine, please review the Maine CDC website for public vaccination locations https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites or call 211.

COVID Vaccine Information as of 2/17/21:

DFD Russell Medical Center anticipates receiving an additional 100 doses of COVID-19 Vaccine for our patients who are over 70 years of age. If we do in fact receive a shipment from Maine CDC we will be holding a clinic, by appointment only, on Saturday February 27, 2021. Due to the limited supply, and uncertainty of when we will receive additional doses, we are scheduling appointments for 2/27/21 on a 1st come 1st booked until we reach the 100. We will update this website weekly. If we are not able to schedule you for 2/27/21 due to limited slots the Maine CDC website for public vaccination locations https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites lists other locations where vaccine is available or you can call 211 for more information.

 

2/15/21:

DFD Russell Medical Center has received a limited amount of COVID-19 Vaccine for our patients who are over 70 years of age and have the highest risk chronic conditions. We will be calling those patients this week to schedule appointments for a vaccine clinic. Due to the limited supply, and uncertainty of when we will receive additional doses, we are not taking names for a waiting list. We will update this website weekly. If patients have not received a call, and would like a vaccine, please review the Maine CDC website for public vaccination locations https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites  or call 211.

1/21/21

We are committed to keeping our communities safe by reducing the risk of exposure and spread of COVID-19. While there are vaccines available in the state of Maine, supplies are limited. DFD Russell does not currently have a vaccine supply at this time due to State allocations to hospitals exclusively.

Based on Maine’s phased vaccine roll-out plan, we are currently in Phase 1a. Persons matching the criteria and who are eligible for a vaccine at this time include healthcare personnel, residents and staff of long-term care facilities, public safety personnel, and COVID-19 Response Personnel.

DFD does not have access to vaccines and are not scheduling appointments for vaccinations. To learn more visit the links below:

To learn which phase you are in, click here. (https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines).

If you are eligible to receive a vaccine based on the requirements of Phase 1a, visit the list of available vaccine sites here.(https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites).

If you have high-risk medical conditions, you may be eligible for a vaccine in upcoming Phase 1b. Check here for details. (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html)

DFD will provide patients with a copy of their medical conditions list for which they are being treated in order to obtain a vaccine in Phase 1b. Patients can either print it from their Patient Portal or can obtain a copy by calling the office and completing a release form. DFD will not be writing individual letters of medical necessity.

DFD will provide updates as new information becomes available.

 

7/24/20

DFD Russell Medical Centers may be limited in the ability to test those concerned for risk of coronavirus exposure in the absence of symptoms.  As testing supplies are, at times, in short order, we must prioritize how they are used to ensure we have the ability to test when needed and if the demand increases in our area.  We may not always be capable of meeting the demand for travelers. Tests at DFDRMC require an office visit in addition to the test. Below are two website links that will direct you to a nearby independent testing site that will utilize the Executive Standing Order for testing in the State of Maine.  Please contact us with any other questions.”

The website links are listed below in case you would like to paste them in your browser.  

Access the state of Maine site through DHHS with some background information:

https://www.maine.gov/covid19/restartingmaine/keepmainehealthy/testing

 

Enter zip code you live in and it will give you all available locations close to you:

https://get-tested-covid19.org/

5/11/20

To protect DFD staff and our vulnerable patients from the spread of communicable diseases, DFD will be taking the following precautions:

DFD will continue to see patients in Leeds and Turner on a reduced schedule. We require all patients wear a mask regardless of the reason for your visit. We will not allow individuals into the buildings without a mask.

Upon your arrival at DFD, please ring the doorbell. We will be screening patients at the door prior to their appointment, which includes taking your temperature and asking a series of questions. If an exam room is ready, you will be brought to one immediately. If not, we ask that you wait in your vehicle until one is available. Please note, we are limiting the number of people who enter our building; only the patient or the patient and a guardian will be permitted to enter.

Monmouth continues to be closed to well-care and is seeing those with respiratory illness only. We are not accepting walk-ins or taking paperwork to be completed at this time at any of our locations.

Thank you for your understanding and patience during these uncertain times.

 

3/21/20

Until further notice, DFD patients who have respiratory symptoms will be seen exclusively in our Monmouth location to minimize staff exposure and conserve Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). No well visits, behavioral health, or lab draws will be seen in Monmouth.

If your regular provider is located in Monmouth you can still receive care at our other locations and they will coordinate with their colleagues to keep you healthy.

Any chronic care or other face-to-face visits will be seen in either Leeds or Turner. Patients will be screened at the door for fever or respiratory symptoms.

All lab draws in Leeds and Turner will also be given an appointment time due to reduced staffing and the need to ensure we do not leave patients waiting in the waiting rooms.

We no longer have evening hours in any location and this will be the final weekend of office hours for the next 30 days. We will continue to have a provider on call to answer questions.

Thank you for your understanding as we do our best to care for our patients and staff while social distancing.

TeleHealth and Virtual Visits by Phone:

DFD Russell is working to expand access to most primary care and ALL behavioral health services by tele-medicine over the next several weeks.

Our goal is to continue to serve our patients by phone or computer to minimize disruption to care. Things are changing rapidly. Please understand our teams are working as quickly as possible to secure the technology and train staff in its use. We will continue to triage calls and determine the best way to safely meet patient needs.

3/18/20

DFD is putting additional safety measures in place and will be screening all patients who have a scheduled visit prior to having them enter the buildings. Please ring the doorbell and a staff member will meet you at the door.

Additionally, we are limiting visitors to those with scheduled appointments only. Family members will be asked to wait in their cars as we are trying to avoid leaving people in the waiting room or having more people in the exam rooms than necessary.

We will not be taking walk-ins for any reason (including paperwork or to schedule) please call ahead.

 

DFD: A Proud Community Health Center

Community health centers are an important part of the healthcare system, serving rural and vulnerable neighborhoods. They are the providers of choice in medically underserved areas of the country. Maine is home to twenty community health centers with over seventy service locations statewide. DFD Russell Medical Centers is such a community health center and is honored to serve more than 8,000 patients in the communities of Leeds, Turner, and Monmouth, Maine.

 

Why Visit a CHC like DFD?

  • Community health centers are patient-focused and community-oriented
  • More services under one roof: patient visits, behavioral health, and dental care
  • CHCs are open more evening and weekend hours making care more accessible
  • Community health centers offer comprehensive, high-quality primary care to anyone regardless of health insurance or financial status
  • Supportive services such as educational, transitional, pharmacy and transportation services are also available
  • Governing boards are at least 51% community members

Did you know?

In the past two years, Maine community health centers have served:

  • 41,114 children
  • 6,632 homeless patients
  • 10,635 veterans
  • 266,664 patients for mental health and substance use disorder treatment

 

Celebrate with us!

Join DFD as we celebrate National Health Care Center week beginning on August 4, 2019. This week is dedicated to educating the public on why health care centers do what we do, how you can help, and honoring those who rely on us for top-quality care.

Are You Tick Smart?

Ticks thrive in Maine’s wooded and unmaintained areas, such as high grass and leaf debris. They are particularly established in southern and coastal parts of the state. This year is an especially high-risk season but there’s no need to be afraid as long as you’re being tick smart.

Prevent ticks from reaching your backyard:

  • Maintain your yard by mowing grass regularly and attending to leaves, shrubs, etc.
  • Wear long-sleeved and light-colored clothing
  • Use insect repellant with at least 20% Deet
  • Have your pets vaccinated or medicated against ticks
  • Have a professional spray a perimeter pesticide

 

MYTH: Ticks die every winter.

Check yourself every day for ticks that may have hitched a ride:

  • Have a partner/parent help to check areas you can’t easily see
  • Check between toes, hands, underarms, behind the knees, around and in ears and hair
  • Shower after being outside—this helps wash off any ticks
  • Don’t re-wear outdoor clothes; tumble dry on high to kill ticks trapped in clothing

 

MYTH: Every type of tick carries disease.

If you see a tick attached to your skin, remove it immediately. It takes 36 hours for bacteria to leave the tick and be injected into your body.

  • With tweezers: pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t jerk or twist—this may cause tick material to stay in your skin.
  • With a tick spoon: apply slight downward pressure to skin and push forward under the tick’s body.
  • Do not crush the tick with your fingers! Put in alcohol or flush it down the toilet.
  • Wash your hands immediately and soak tweezers in alcohol, if needed.

 

MYTH: You’ll know if you get a tick bite.

If you were recently bitten by a tick and removal was successful, it’s still important to check your skin. If you have a rash, headaches, fever and flu-like symptoms after a tick bite, call your primary care provider right away.