Introducing Secure Online Bill Pay

A fast, secure and convenient way to pay your bill online.

At DFD Russell Medical Center, we are committed to making your healthcare experience simple and reliable, including the way you pay your bill. Secure Online Bill Pay is fast, convenient and accessible 24 hours a day, seven days per week.

You don’t have to have to have a patient portal to use Secure Online Bill Pay—anyone can pay online.

What you will need:

  • Most recent billing statement
  • Patient account number

How to use Secure Online Bill Pay:

  • Simply go to dfdrussell.org
  • Select “Pay my bill” from the For our Patients drop down menu
  • Enter the required information
  • Pay using desktop, tablet or smart phone

Accepted payments include major credit cards, debit cards, or electronic withdrawal from a checking or savings account.

Payments are still accepted through mail or by phone.

If you have questions about your bill or making payments online, please reach out to us at (207) 524-3501

 

 

 

Minding Your Mental Health

Mental health is your emotional, psychological and overall wellbeing. It affects how you think, feel and act. It also helps in establishing how you handle stress, relate to other people, and make choices. Your mental health is not in a static state and requires your attention throughout your entire life.

If you have poor mental health at any point in your life, your thinking, mood, and behaviors could be affected. Family history, life experiences and biological factors such as brain chemistry can contribute to mental health issues.

 

Importance of positive mental health

When you care for your mental health, you’re caring for your overall wellbeing. Positive mental health promotes productivity at work and school, maintains your connections and relationships, and helps you to cope with the stresses of daily life.

There are many ways to maintain positive mental health.

  • Connect with others often
  • Be physically active regularly
  • Volunteer or help others
  • Get proper sleep
  • Eat nutritious meals
  • Talk about your thoughts and feelings
  • Create coping skills for stress

 

Early signs of mental health issues

There are early warning signs to look for whether it’s in your own life or someone you care about. While this isn’t an all-inclusive list, experiencing one or more of the following could indicate a mental health problem:

  • Changes in sleeping patterns
  • Self-isolating from people and normal activities
  • Changes in energy levels
  • Showing signs of apathy or disinterest
  • Feeling hopeless or helpless
  • Any unexplained aches and pains
  • Unusual irritability
  • Severe mood swings
  • Using substances more frequently (alcohol, smoking, drugs)
  • Inability to perform daily tasks

 

Quick note: If you need professional help, don’t be afraid—reach out. Discuss recommended courses of action with your healthcare provider.

Those with poor mental health or a diagnosed mental illness have increased chances of physical health issues such as stroke, diabetes, and heart disease. Your mental and physical health go hand in hand and are integral to your overall wellbeing.

COVID-19 Updates

The health and safety of our patients, staff, and community are of the highest priority to DFD Russell Medical Centers.

We are committed to taking all necessary precautions to actively reduce the risk of further transmission of COVID-19 in our community. Please reference this page and our Facebook page for updates regarding COVID-19.

5/11/20

To protect DFD staff and our vulnerable patients from the spread of communicable diseases, DFD will be taking the following precautions:

DFD will continue to see patients in Leeds and Turner on a reduced schedule. We require all patients wear a mask regardless of the reason for your visit. We will not allow individuals into the buildings without a mask.

Upon your arrival at DFD, please ring the doorbell. We will be screening patients at the door prior to their appointment, which includes taking your temperature and asking a series of questions. If an exam room is ready, you will be brought to one immediately. If not, we ask that you wait in your vehicle until one is available. Please note, we are limiting the number of people who enter our building; only the patient or the patient and a guardian will be permitted to enter.

Monmouth continues to be closed to well-care and is seeing those with respiratory illness only. We are not accepting walk-ins or taking paperwork to be completed at this time at any of our locations.

Thank you for your understanding and patience during these uncertain times.

 

3/21/20

Until further notice, DFD patients who have respiratory symptoms will be seen exclusively in our Monmouth location to minimize staff exposure and conserve Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). No well visits, behavioral health, or lab draws will be seen in Monmouth.

If your regular provider is located in Monmouth you can still receive care at our other locations and they will coordinate with their colleagues to keep you healthy.

Any chronic care or other face-to-face visits will be seen in either Leeds or Turner. Patients will be screened at the door for fever or respiratory symptoms.

All lab draws in Leeds and Turner will also be given an appointment time due to reduced staffing and the need to ensure we do not leave patients waiting in the waiting rooms.

We no longer have evening hours in any location and this will be the final weekend of office hours for the next 30 days. We will continue to have a provider on call to answer questions.

Thank you for your understanding as we do our best to care for our patients and staff while social distancing.

TeleHealth and Virtual Visits by Phone:

DFD Russell is working to expand access to most primary care and ALL behavioral health services by tele-medicine over the next several weeks.

Our goal is to continue to serve our patients by phone or computer to minimize disruption to care. Things are changing rapidly. Please understand our teams are working as quickly as possible to secure the technology and train staff in its use. We will continue to triage calls and determine the best way to safely meet patient needs.

3/18/20

DFD is putting additional safety measures in place and will be screening all patients who have a scheduled visit prior to having them enter the buildings. Please ring the doorbell and a staff member will meet you at the door.

Additionally, we are limiting visitors to those with scheduled appointments only. Family members will be asked to wait in their cars as we are trying to avoid leaving people in the waiting room or having more people in the exam rooms than necessary.

We will not be taking walk-ins for any reason (including paperwork or to schedule) please call ahead.

 

DFD: A Proud Community Health Center

Community health centers are an important part of the healthcare system, serving rural and vulnerable neighborhoods. They are the providers of choice in medically underserved areas of the country. Maine is home to twenty community health centers with over seventy service locations statewide. DFD Russell Medical Centers is such a community health center and is honored to serve more than 8,000 patients in the communities of Leeds, Turner, and Monmouth, Maine.

 

Why Visit a CHC like DFD?

  • Community health centers are patient-focused and community-oriented
  • More services under one roof: patient visits, behavioral health, and dental care
  • CHCs are open more evening and weekend hours making care more accessible
  • Community health centers offer comprehensive, high-quality primary care to anyone regardless of health insurance or financial status
  • Supportive services such as educational, transitional, pharmacy and transportation services are also available
  • Governing boards are at least 51% community members

Did you know?

In the past two years, Maine community health centers have served:

  • 41,114 children
  • 6,632 homeless patients
  • 10,635 veterans
  • 266,664 patients for mental health and substance use disorder treatment

 

Celebrate with us!

Join DFD as we celebrate National Health Care Center week beginning on August 4, 2019. This week is dedicated to educating the public on why health care centers do what we do, how you can help, and honoring those who rely on us for top-quality care.

Are You Tick Smart?

Ticks thrive in Maine’s wooded and unmaintained areas, such as high grass and leaf debris. They are particularly established in southern and coastal parts of the state. This year is an especially high-risk season but there’s no need to be afraid as long as you’re being tick smart.

Prevent ticks from reaching your backyard:

  • Maintain your yard by mowing grass regularly and attending to leaves, shrubs, etc.
  • Wear long-sleeved and light-colored clothing
  • Use insect repellant with at least 20% Deet
  • Have your pets vaccinated or medicated against ticks
  • Have a professional spray a perimeter pesticide

 

MYTH: Ticks die every winter.

Check yourself every day for ticks that may have hitched a ride:

  • Have a partner/parent help to check areas you can’t easily see
  • Check between toes, hands, underarms, behind the knees, around and in ears and hair
  • Shower after being outside—this helps wash off any ticks
  • Don’t re-wear outdoor clothes; tumble dry on high to kill ticks trapped in clothing

 

MYTH: Every type of tick carries disease.

If you see a tick attached to your skin, remove it immediately. It takes 36 hours for bacteria to leave the tick and be injected into your body.

  • With tweezers: pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t jerk or twist—this may cause tick material to stay in your skin.
  • With a tick spoon: apply slight downward pressure to skin and push forward under the tick’s body.
  • Do not crush the tick with your fingers! Put in alcohol or flush it down the toilet.
  • Wash your hands immediately and soak tweezers in alcohol, if needed.

 

MYTH: You’ll know if you get a tick bite.

If you were recently bitten by a tick and removal was successful, it’s still important to check your skin. If you have a rash, headaches, fever and flu-like symptoms after a tick bite, call your primary care provider right away.

 “Cooking Matters for Parents” – A Class to Boost Nutrition Skills and Education

The University of Maine Cooperative Extension is hosting “Cooking Matters for Parents,” a nutrition education class funded by the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program. In this class, parents will learn how to cook new recipes, choose healthy foods, save money when grocery shopping, keep food safe to eat, and how to help their families to become more active. Children are welcome to attend with participating adults.

This program is federally-funded and intended to assist low-income families to meet nutritional requirements. It is free for income eligible adults and for those who are eligible for SNAP, WIC, or Head Start.

Interested in attending the Cooking Matters for Parents class? Check out the details below:

 

DATES: Mondays and Wednesdays

March 18, 20, 25, 27

April 1, 3, 8 & 10

TIME: 5:30p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

LOCATION: Winthrop Middle School

COST: Free for income eligible adults

*Registration required

 

This class is a wonderful way to learn new skills with your family and adopt a healthier lifestyle together. To register for a spot in the class, email Debbie Barnett at deborah.barnett@maine.edu

DFD Takes the Dempsey Challenge

DFD is excited to support our communities and encourage others to walk, run or bike in support of The Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope & Healing in this year’s Dempsey Challenge.

When and Where does this happen?
The 2017 Dempsey Challenge takes place in Lewsiton-Auburn, Maine, September 29-30.

runnersWhat does it benefit?
Proceeds from the challenge go to the Dempsey Center. The Dempsey Center offers a vibrant and compassionate environment where an interdisciplinary team of oncology professionals improves the healing experience for those impacted by cancer. Through customized programs The Dempsey Center provides support services that complement treatments, support caregivers, patients and their families equally Source: Demspeycenter.org

How to get involved:
Anyone can get involved and there is an event for everyone.

Bike – 10, 25, 70, or 100 miles
Two-day 140+ mile bike ride presented by L.L. Bean
Run or walk 5K (3.1 miles) and 10K (6.2 miles)
Festival in the Park – Saturday 8 am – 1 pm, Sunday 9 am – 5 pm
Music Festival at Festival in the Park
Kid’s Fun Run and Family Ride
Survivor Walk
You can show your love for team DFD by donating your loose change at one of our coin jars at the front desk at each DFD Health Center location or to one of our team members using this link: http://support.dempseychallenge.org/site/TR?company_id=3823&fr_id=1150&pg=company

To learn more about The Dempsey Challenge please visit:

Dempsey Challenge Information

School Safety 101

DFD’s helpful tips for a fun and safe school year.

Class is back in session and DFD is here to help get your child;s school year off to a safe and healthy start.

Your child’s backpack should:

  • Have a padded back
  • Have wide, padded shoulder straps
  • Be the right fit: below the shoulder blades and right at the waist

School Bus Rules

When getting on the bus, remind your children to:

  • Stay away from traffic when waiting for the bus
  • Line up away from the street or road as the bus approaches
  • Wait until the bus has completely stopped and the door opens before entering

While riding the bus, remind your children to:

  • Buckle up if seat belts are available
  • Stay in their seat
  • Keep aisles clear of books and bags
  • Wait for the bus to completely stop before getting up from your seat

When getting off the bus, remind your children to:

  • Use the handrail when exiting the bus
  • Make sure the driver can see them
  • Stay away from the rear wheels at all times
  • When crossing the street, wait for a signal from the bus driver

Stop bullying in its tracks.

Make sure your kids are ready for a kind and caring school year. Remind them that bullying is never ok.

  • 30% of young people admit to bullying others
  • 28% of students in grades 6-12 experience bullying
  • When bystanders intervene, bullying stops within 10 seconds

National Immunization Awareness Month

August is National Immunization Awareness Month and DFD wants to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages. Vaccines help prevent dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases.

How does a vaccine work?

Vaccines are made from the same germs that cause disease, but the germs in the vaccines are either killed or weakened so they won’t make you sick. Once the vaccine is injected into your body, your immune system reacts to the vaccine by making antibodies. The antibodies destroy the vaccine germs, and then stay in your body, giving you immunity if you are ever exposed to the real disease. The antibodies are there to protect you!

Why are vaccines important?

Diseases like polio are becoming very rare in the U.S. because we have been vaccinating against them. However, vaccine-preventable diseases such as whooping cough and measles are still a threat and continue to infect U.S. children—resulting in hospitalizations and deaths each year.  The spread of dangerous diseases happen when children who aren’t vaccinated spread disease to other children who are too young to be vaccinated or to people with weakened immune systems.

Check out these new videos from the National Vaccine Program Office and learn how vaccines can keep you and the people you love stay healthy.



National Health Center Week: August 12-18

This August we celebrate National Health Center Week to raise awareness of the important role health centers play in our communities.

Health centers serve 27 million patients in the United States, which is about one in fifteen people who utilize health centers as their health care home. As a Patient-Centered Medical Home, DFD meets and exceeds the healthcare needs of its patients through innovative, patient-centered primary care services.

Health centers across the United States perform just as well or better than private physicians on 94% of quality measures and save an average of $1,263 per patient per year.

DFD is the highest-ranking community health center in Maine and the nation for its commitment to quality care. But what makes DFD different from other providers?

  • More night and weekend hours
  • More likely to accept new patients
  • Community-governed
  • More services under one roof

Together, let’s raise awareness about the positive impacts health centers have on our communities. Share with friends and family on how DFD is supporting our neighborhoods and can help support them.