Shake Off Sugar for Your Health

Did you know that sugar is the most popular ingredient added to foods in the United States? In fact, the average American consumes 152 pounds per year—that’s three pounds per week! Serious health complications can arise when too much sugar is consumed including weight gain or obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. In order to quit our habit with sugar (or have a healthier relationship with it) we must become more educated about it.

 

Americans, aged 6 years and older, consumed about 14% of total daily calories from added sugars in 2003–2010. (source: cdc.gov)

 

What is sugar? The most popular sweetener, sugar can go by many names, making it more difficult to limit. When reading packages and labels, look for these terms that refer to sugar: sucrose, maltose, fructose, glucose, dextrose, lactose, corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup, malt syrup, molasses, and brown sugar. Keep in mind that healthy alternatives still act as sugar in your body and these can include maple syrup, raw sugar, agave nectar and stevia.

 

Where is sugar hidden? You may know that sugar is in foods such as ice cream, cakes, cookies and other sweet treats. But it’s also added to many packaged foods too. When grocery shopping and preparing meals, it’s important to read labels for any of the above-mentioned sugary ingredients. These are common foods with hidden added sugars:

  • Tomato sauce
  • Canned soup
  • Breads
  • Dried fruit
  • Granola
  • Yogurt
  • Cereal
  • Juice, smoothies
  • Condiments

 

How much sugar is safe to eat? Since we all have different levels of health, this is best discussed with your primary health care provider. However, a general guideline is 9 teaspoons per day for men, and 6 teaspoons per day for women.

 

How can I keep my sugar intake in check? First and foremost, discuss any health concerns with your doctor. Next, become comfortable reading nutrition labels on every food item you purchase—especially those impulse items you grab when you’re hungry. Finally, be cautious when ordering take out or dining at a restaurant. Ask how foods are prepared and what, if any, ingredients are added during preparation.

 

Take matters into your own hands and start swapping out your favorite sugary foods for a healthier option. You can start here by swapping:

  • Soda and juice for water or unsweetened seltzer
  • Flavored yogurt for plain yogurt with fresh fruit
  • Bottled salad dressings for homemade dressings
  • Ketchup for unsweetened ketchup
  • Bread and tortillas for lettuce

 

 

Sources: cdc.gov, dhhs.nh.gov

DFD Russell Free Flu Shot Clinic

November flu shot clinic open to adult DFD patients

DFD Russell Medical Centers is offering a free flu clinic for its patients on Saturday, November 7 from 10am-2pm at our Monmouth, Turner and Leeds locations.

Getting a flu shot lowers your risk of contracting the seasonal flu by 40-60%.

To participate…

Arrive at your DFD clinic location between the hours of 10am-2pm on Saturday, November 7, 2020. Because there is limited availability of seasonal flu vaccines, it’s best that you arrive early. Patients will be seen in the order in which they arrive and must be at least 18 years old.

Please Stay home if…

To keep our communities safe, we ask that you arrive wearing a mask or face covering and remain socially distanced from others. Reported symptoms of COVID-19 vary but include symptoms similar to those caused by the seasonal flu. Stay home to rest if you have:

  • fever or chills
  • cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing
  • new loss of taste and/or smell
  • headache, fatigue, body aches
  • sore throat, congestion, runny nose
  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea

Flu vaccines protect you and your family and help prevent the spread of illnesses. In fact, around half of all Americans get a flu shot each year!

 

Can’t attend this flu clinic? Call your primary care provider to schedule a seasonal flu shot for yourself and your family today!

Can I Get a Good Workout in the Water?

Lying on the beach or by the pool is relaxing, but water can also be a great tool to implement into your workout routine. Exercising in water provides the resistance needed to strengthen muscles while also relieving joints of high impact pressure of other exercises. It’s also a great way to stay cool and beat the summer heat!

Exercising in water can be just what you need to change up your routine this summer. Performing different exercises and movements allows your body to rest, develop different muscles, and prevent fatigue or injury. Get out there and try something new this summer!

 

Stand-Up Paddleboarding

  • A full-body workout that’s always a fun way to get on the water. Your core and legs activate for balance, and your arms, shoulders, and upper back work to paddle you around. Using the stand-up paddleboard to float on top of the water adds an extra layer of challenge to yoga and other stretching exercises.

Swimming

  • Whether in a pool or open body of water, swimming is an excellent form of cardio that also strengthens your entire body. Swimming is low impact and therefore great for your bones and joints. One hour of swimming burns the same amount of calories as running! When swimming, be aware of your surroundings and water depth. Always swim with a buddy.

 

Canoeing/Kayaking

  • A relaxing and recreational activity that allows you take in the scenery and still get in a workout. While you may not work up a sweat paddling in a canoe or kayak, it’s great for developing range of movement and strength in your arms, shoulders and back.

 

Pool Aerobics/Yoga

Walking or jogging laps around the pool are low impact activities that get your heart pumping, building cardiovascular conditioning. Also, you can perform the same exercises in the pool as you do on dry ground! Try these movements the next time you’re in a pool:

  • Place your hands on the edge of the pool to perform strength training pushups
  • Jumping jacks engage both your arms and legs and act as cardio
  • Side shuffles and squats activate quadriceps and glute muscles
  • High knee lift extensions activate your core which is essential for balance
  • The buoyancy of water helps to maintain your balance and increase flexibility when doing yoga poses. Try Tree, Lunge, Warrior, and Chair poses to start.

Be aware of the depth of the pool. Staying near the shallow end is best.

 

Although working out in or near water can help to keep you cool, it’s important to remember these safety tips:

  • Always take a buddy with you when in or near water
  • Know your surroundings, the depth of water and ways to exit the water
  • Keep yourself well hydrated all day
  • Use sunscreen once every two hours even water-resistant brands
  • Avoid working out during the hottest times of the day

 

Living Well Workshops by Healthy Living for ME

Now Open for Registration! 

 

DFD Russell Medical Centers is excited to announce new workshops by Healthy Living for Me. These workshops each discuss one topic including Living Well for Better Health, Living with Chronic Pain and Living with Diabetes.

Healthy Living for Me is an online resource providing evidence-based health education, fitness instruction and self-care strategies with the aim of improving wellness and quality of life.

These workshops are free to the public however, registration is required. Attendance can be over the Zoom platform or by telephone. Each class is led by a team of three instructors from different organization partners including Bonny Eagle Adult Education and Spectrum Generations.

 

Interested in virtually attending one of these class series? Check out the details below:

 

Living Well for Better Health: 6-session series

WHEN: Tuesdays, September 15 – October 20, 2020
TIME: 1pm – 3pm
WHERE: Online via Zoom
INFO: Register here or by contacting Katherine Mills: kmills@healthylivingforme.org or (207) 440-2390.

 

Living Well with Chronic Pain: 6-session series

WHEN: Wednesdays, September 30 – November 4, 2020
TIME: TBD
WHERE: Online, via Zoom or by telephone
INFO: For details and course information: email info@healthylivingforme.org or call 1-800-620-6036.

 

Living Well with Diabetes: 6-session series

WHEN: Tuesdays, October 6 – November 10, 2020
TIME: 9am – 11am
WHERE: Online via Zoom
INFO: Register here or by contacting Katherine Mills at kmills@healthylivingforme.org or call (207) 440-2390.

Introducing Secure Online Bill Pay

A fast, secure and convenient way to pay your bill online.

At DFD Russell Medical Center, we are committed to making your healthcare experience simple and reliable, including the way you pay your bill. Secure Online Bill Pay is fast, convenient and accessible 24 hours a day, seven days per week.

You don’t have to have to have a patient portal to use Secure Online Bill Pay—anyone can pay online.

What you will need:

  • Most recent billing statement
  • Patient account number

How to use Secure Online Bill Pay:

  • Simply go to dfdrussell.org
  • Select “Pay my bill” from the For our Patients drop down menu
  • Enter the required information
  • Pay using desktop, tablet or smart phone

Accepted payments include major credit cards, debit cards, or electronic withdrawal from a checking or savings account.

Payments are still accepted through mail or by phone.

If you have questions about your bill or making payments online, please reach out to us at (207) 524-3501

 

 

 

Minding Your Mental Health

Mental health is your emotional, psychological and overall wellbeing. It affects how you think, feel and act. It also helps in establishing how you handle stress, relate to other people, and make choices. Your mental health is not in a static state and requires your attention throughout your entire life.

If you have poor mental health at any point in your life, your thinking, mood, and behaviors could be affected. Family history, life experiences and biological factors such as brain chemistry can contribute to mental health issues.

 

Importance of positive mental health

When you care for your mental health, you’re caring for your overall wellbeing. Positive mental health promotes productivity at work and school, maintains your connections and relationships, and helps you to cope with the stresses of daily life.

There are many ways to maintain positive mental health.

  • Connect with others often
  • Be physically active regularly
  • Volunteer or help others
  • Get proper sleep
  • Eat nutritious meals
  • Talk about your thoughts and feelings
  • Create coping skills for stress

 

Early signs of mental health issues

There are early warning signs to look for whether it’s in your own life or someone you care about. While this isn’t an all-inclusive list, experiencing one or more of the following could indicate a mental health problem:

  • Changes in sleeping patterns
  • Self-isolating from people and normal activities
  • Changes in energy levels
  • Showing signs of apathy or disinterest
  • Feeling hopeless or helpless
  • Any unexplained aches and pains
  • Unusual irritability
  • Severe mood swings
  • Using substances more frequently (alcohol, smoking, drugs)
  • Inability to perform daily tasks

 

Quick note: If you need professional help, don’t be afraid—reach out. Discuss recommended courses of action with your healthcare provider.

Those with poor mental health or a diagnosed mental illness have increased chances of physical health issues such as stroke, diabetes, and heart disease. Your mental and physical health go hand in hand and are integral to your overall wellbeing.

COVID-19 Updates

The health and safety of our patients, staff, and community are of the highest priority to DFD Russell Medical Centers.

We are committed to taking all necessary precautions to actively reduce the risk of further transmission of COVID-19 in our community. Please reference this page and our Facebook page for updates regarding COVID-19.

 

COVID Vaccine Information as of 3/15/21:

DFD Russell Medical Center is not currently scheduling vaccine clinics for 1st doses. We will be delivering 2nd doses to those who we have previously vaccinated but are not taking names for a waiting list at this time.

We will update this website weekly. If patients would like a vaccine, please review the Maine CDC website for public vaccination locations https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites or call 211.

COVID Vaccine Information as of 3/1/21:

DFD Russell Medical Center has received a limited amount of COVID-19 Vaccine for our patients who are over 60 years of age and have the highest risk chronic conditions. We will be calling those patients this week (starting 3/1/21) to schedule appointments for a vaccine clinic on Saturday March 6th.

Due to the limited supply, and uncertainty of when we will receive additional doses, we will not be able to meet all demands of this population (we have over 3,000 pts and only 100 doses). We will update this website weekly. If patients have not received a call, and would like a vaccine, please review the Maine CDC website for public vaccination locations https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites or call 211.

COVID Vaccine Information as of 2/17/21:

DFD Russell Medical Center anticipates receiving an additional 100 doses of COVID-19 Vaccine for our patients who are over 70 years of age. If we do in fact receive a shipment from Maine CDC we will be holding a clinic, by appointment only, on Saturday February 27, 2021. Due to the limited supply, and uncertainty of when we will receive additional doses, we are scheduling appointments for 2/27/21 on a 1st come 1st booked until we reach the 100. We will update this website weekly. If we are not able to schedule you for 2/27/21 due to limited slots the Maine CDC website for public vaccination locations https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites lists other locations where vaccine is available or you can call 211 for more information.

 

2/15/21:

DFD Russell Medical Center has received a limited amount of COVID-19 Vaccine for our patients who are over 70 years of age and have the highest risk chronic conditions. We will be calling those patients this week to schedule appointments for a vaccine clinic. Due to the limited supply, and uncertainty of when we will receive additional doses, we are not taking names for a waiting list. We will update this website weekly. If patients have not received a call, and would like a vaccine, please review the Maine CDC website for public vaccination locations https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites  or call 211.

1/21/21

We are committed to keeping our communities safe by reducing the risk of exposure and spread of COVID-19. While there are vaccines available in the state of Maine, supplies are limited. DFD Russell does not currently have a vaccine supply at this time due to State allocations to hospitals exclusively.

Based on Maine’s phased vaccine roll-out plan, we are currently in Phase 1a. Persons matching the criteria and who are eligible for a vaccine at this time include healthcare personnel, residents and staff of long-term care facilities, public safety personnel, and COVID-19 Response Personnel.

DFD does not have access to vaccines and are not scheduling appointments for vaccinations. To learn more visit the links below:

To learn which phase you are in, click here. (https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines).

If you are eligible to receive a vaccine based on the requirements of Phase 1a, visit the list of available vaccine sites here.(https://www.maine.gov/covid19/vaccines/vaccination-sites).

If you have high-risk medical conditions, you may be eligible for a vaccine in upcoming Phase 1b. Check here for details. (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html)

DFD will provide patients with a copy of their medical conditions list for which they are being treated in order to obtain a vaccine in Phase 1b. Patients can either print it from their Patient Portal or can obtain a copy by calling the office and completing a release form. DFD will not be writing individual letters of medical necessity.

DFD will provide updates as new information becomes available.

 

7/24/20

DFD Russell Medical Centers may be limited in the ability to test those concerned for risk of coronavirus exposure in the absence of symptoms.  As testing supplies are, at times, in short order, we must prioritize how they are used to ensure we have the ability to test when needed and if the demand increases in our area.  We may not always be capable of meeting the demand for travelers. Tests at DFDRMC require an office visit in addition to the test. Below are two website links that will direct you to a nearby independent testing site that will utilize the Executive Standing Order for testing in the State of Maine.  Please contact us with any other questions.”

The website links are listed below in case you would like to paste them in your browser.  

Access the state of Maine site through DHHS with some background information:

https://www.maine.gov/covid19/restartingmaine/keepmainehealthy/testing

 

Enter zip code you live in and it will give you all available locations close to you:

https://get-tested-covid19.org/

5/11/20

To protect DFD staff and our vulnerable patients from the spread of communicable diseases, DFD will be taking the following precautions:

DFD will continue to see patients in Leeds and Turner on a reduced schedule. We require all patients wear a mask regardless of the reason for your visit. We will not allow individuals into the buildings without a mask.

Upon your arrival at DFD, please ring the doorbell. We will be screening patients at the door prior to their appointment, which includes taking your temperature and asking a series of questions. If an exam room is ready, you will be brought to one immediately. If not, we ask that you wait in your vehicle until one is available. Please note, we are limiting the number of people who enter our building; only the patient or the patient and a guardian will be permitted to enter.

Monmouth continues to be closed to well-care and is seeing those with respiratory illness only. We are not accepting walk-ins or taking paperwork to be completed at this time at any of our locations.

Thank you for your understanding and patience during these uncertain times.

 

3/21/20

Until further notice, DFD patients who have respiratory symptoms will be seen exclusively in our Monmouth location to minimize staff exposure and conserve Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). No well visits, behavioral health, or lab draws will be seen in Monmouth.

If your regular provider is located in Monmouth you can still receive care at our other locations and they will coordinate with their colleagues to keep you healthy.

Any chronic care or other face-to-face visits will be seen in either Leeds or Turner. Patients will be screened at the door for fever or respiratory symptoms.

All lab draws in Leeds and Turner will also be given an appointment time due to reduced staffing and the need to ensure we do not leave patients waiting in the waiting rooms.

We no longer have evening hours in any location and this will be the final weekend of office hours for the next 30 days. We will continue to have a provider on call to answer questions.

Thank you for your understanding as we do our best to care for our patients and staff while social distancing.

TeleHealth and Virtual Visits by Phone:

DFD Russell is working to expand access to most primary care and ALL behavioral health services by tele-medicine over the next several weeks.

Our goal is to continue to serve our patients by phone or computer to minimize disruption to care. Things are changing rapidly. Please understand our teams are working as quickly as possible to secure the technology and train staff in its use. We will continue to triage calls and determine the best way to safely meet patient needs.

3/18/20

DFD is putting additional safety measures in place and will be screening all patients who have a scheduled visit prior to having them enter the buildings. Please ring the doorbell and a staff member will meet you at the door.

Additionally, we are limiting visitors to those with scheduled appointments only. Family members will be asked to wait in their cars as we are trying to avoid leaving people in the waiting room or having more people in the exam rooms than necessary.

We will not be taking walk-ins for any reason (including paperwork or to schedule) please call ahead.

 

Staying Healthy When Dealing With Stress

In times of high stress and uncertainty, it’s easy to let our routines and healthy habits fall to the wayside. But if we let anxiety and stress overwhelm us, our health could suffer. This is the opposite of what your body and mind need! Let’s talk about some easy ways to focus on nutrition and mental health during overwhelming times or a crisis.

 

Healthy Eating

It may be tempting to stock up and binge on non-perishables such as chips, cookies and crackers, but these are mostly void of nutritional value. A consistently nutritious diet (with a few treats here and there) is critical for maintaining bodyweight, avoiding illness, and minimizing stress. Here are some food choices to focus on:

  • Healthy fats: avocados, eggs, nuts for satiety and mood regulation
  • Lean proteins: help to balance and boost serotonin levels
  • Bananas: rich in B vitamins for nervous system function
  • Citrus fruits: shown to decrease stress; Vitamin C boosts immunity
  • Dark, leafy greens: regulate cortisol and blood pressure

If you’re spending more time at home with your family, now is a great time to try new foods and recipes. Coming together to create a meal is a perfect way to bond and stay connected.

 

Exercise

If your local gym, fitness center, or group class isn’t accessible, you don’t need to forfeit your physical activity efforts. When you keep with your exercise routine—even if the activity looks different—you’re helping your body and mind. If you don’t have access to your favorite instructors or equipment, try these at home:

  • Take daily walks around your house or neighborhood
  • Use trails for hiking and safe roads for running
  • Strength train using bodyweight or items around the house
  • Take advantage of streaming apps or social media for home workouts

Keeping your body moving lowers stress and risk of illnesses and maintains your bodyweight, all of which are essential to your health. Don’t forget that yard work and other household chores also get your body moving!

 

Mental Health

A healthy diet and exercise are essential, but your mental health is just as important especially in times of unease. If you’re having anxious thoughts and feelings, reacting to stress in a negative way, and are having trouble sleeping, then your mental health may need your attention.

Try some of the following when you’re stressed or anxious:

  • Step outside: fresh air and Vitamin D are good for boosting mood
  • Deep breathing: focused, mindful breathing eases anxiety and stress
  • Meditation: consistent practice can keep your mind calm and centered
  • Stretching: loosens muscles and brings awareness to any tension

There are many ways to address your mental health, some may work for you and some may not. This is okay! Find what works and adopt them into your routine.

Additionally, getting proper sleep is vital to your overall health. When we are asleep, our body is restoring muscles from exercise, digesting the meals we’ve enjoyed, and improving our memory and cognition.

Adapting to a new routine in a time of stress may take some time. Be consistent and patient with yourself. Keeping your body and mind healthy are the best things you can do in a time of uncertainty.

If stress or anxiety is impacting your day-to-day life, reach out to a medical professional right away.

Nutrition: 101

Nutrition—what does it actually mean? Yes, nutrition is the biological process of providing your body with proper foods for growth and function, but it’s also more than that. Nutrition is about making informed decisions to better your physical, mental and emotional health. Let’s discuss some manageable ways to focus on nutrition for you and your family.

 

Healthy Eating

While there are many different resources out there, the USDA recommends that your meals consist of:

  • half vegetables and whole fruits
  • one quarter whole grains
  • one quarter protein
  • some healthy fats (such as nuts, seeds, olive and coconut oils)

Food choices will be different for everyone and dependent on food access, affordability, traditions and cultures, and food preferences (including vegetarianism, veganism, etc.).

With this new way of approaching food, your main focuses will be to eat more nutritious foods, trying a variety of nutritious foods and being careful not to restrict certain foods or go on fad diets.

When you start to eat more fruits, veggies, whole grains, lean protein, and healthy fats, you’ll start to see that:

  • your digestive system works more efficiently
  • you feel less hungry between meals (preventing junk food snacking)
  • your energy increases

As your body grows accustomed to new and nutritious foods, you’ll see that you start eating less refined carbohydrates and refined sugars which contribute to poor diet, weight gain, and illnesses.

Try this: Include at least one new nutrient-dense food into every meal.

 

Physical Activity

Keeping your body active lowers your risk of many illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and depression. When you eat and drink, you’re taking in calories that your body uses for normal functioning. However, Americans tend to eat larger portions than needed—and usually more refined carbohydrates and sugars—leaving an excess of calories just waiting to be burned!

Remember, you can’t exercise your way from a bad diet. This means that if you’re looking to lose weight, exercise alone will not work. The harmony of eating healthier foods and moving your body will help you maintain a healthy weight. Try to keep the following in mind:

  • Walking helps your body to digest its food
  • Muscles need carbohydrates and protein for energy and muscle repair
  • The more intense the exercise, the more calories you burn

When adopting healthier lifestyle habits, it’s also important to learn to listen to your body. For instance, if you’re recovering from the flu, your body needs rest and fluids more than it needs intense exercise.

Try this: Incorporate 30 minutes of exercise into your daily routine. This could mean taking the stairs, parking at the far end of parking lots, and walking around your office building during lunch—any movement is better than no movement.

 

Emotional Health

Emotional health is another important aspect of your nutrition. Emotions can greatly affect food and exercise choices. There are many different reasons for this including stress, family celebrations and obligations, and “emotional eating.”

A quick note on emotional eating: everyone has experienced eating while bored, stressed or otherwise emotional. If you have trouble controlling emotional eating, please speak with your health care provider right away.

Eating healthy meals and snacks will help fuel your body appropriately making exercise easier and better for your body. Exercise can:

  • increase your overall energy and boosts your mood
  • help you sleep better at night
  • reduce stress, anxiety, depression symptoms
  • increase self-esteem and confidence

Consider your emotions when you crave “junk food,” or when you don’t feel like exercising. Is there something going on in your life? Will you feel better after exercise, a healthy meal, or rest?

Try this: Keep a record or journal of how exercise and healthy foods make you feel. This information can serve as motivation if you need a boost.

 

Adopting a nutritious lifestyle will be different for everyone. Take it one step at a time, be patient with yourself, and enlist the help of a friend for extra accountability. If you need support and guidance to get started, speak with your primary care provider.

“Ten Tips for Adults” Nutrition Education Classes

Now Open for Registration!

 

DFD Russell Medical Centers is excited to announce a new nutrition education series, “Ten Tips for Adults.”

Educate yourself with healthy, affordable eating and nutrition habits that will benefit you and your entire family through these interactive and engaging classes.

 

Each class is led by a trained nutrition professional from Healthy Androscoggin, where you’ll receive simple, easy-to-follow tips based on the USDA’s “10 Tips Nutrition Series” with themes focusing on “Eating Better on a Budget” or “Choose My Plate” healthy eating guidelines. All classes feature food demonstrations and tastings, take home “10 Tips” handout, and a whole lot of fun!

 

This program is flexible and adaptable for participant needs.

Interested in attending one or all of the “Ten Tips for Adults” nutrition education class series? Check out the details below:

 

Ten Tips For Adults: 4-session series

WHEN: January 21 and 28, February 4 and 11
TIME: 12pm – 1pm
WHERE:
St. Mary’s Nutrition Center
208 Bates Street, Lewiston
INFO: Register by contacting Emily Smith: smith@cmhc.org or (207) 786-1669

 

Ten Tips for Adults: 2-session series

WHEN: January 29 and 30
TIME: 5:30pm – 7:30pm
WHERE:
Lewiston High School (Adult Education)
156 East Ave., Lewiston
INFO: Details and course registration: https://lewiston.maineadulted.org/classes/

 

Ten Tips for Adults: “Eating Better on a Budget” 3-session series

WHEN: January 27, Feb 3 and 10
TIME: 2:00pm – 3:45pm
WHERE:
Dempsey Center
29 Lowell Street, Lewiston
INFO: Details and course registration: https://www.dempseycenter.org/programs/ten-tips-for-eating-better-on-a-budget-lewiston/

 

Ten Tips for Adults: 2 session series

WHEN: February 26 and 27
TIME: 5:30pm – 7:30pm
WHERE:
Lewiston High School (Adult Education)
156 East Ave., Lewiston
INFO: Details and course registration: https://lewiston.maineadulted.org/classes/